Downtown County Band

$8

Get ready for a good time! The Downtown County Band will change your idea of old time music. This young five-piece ensemble returns to the place they got their start, Downtown Frankfort. They have played countless venues across several states, and gained a reputation for artistic excellence. The Downtown County Band plays Memphis blues, appalachian, and jug band music, along with originals written in the old-time tradition. WARNING: THIS IS NOT A BLUEGRASS SHOW!!!!

Carl Jones has been involved in the old-time music community ever since he first attended fiddlers’ conventions in Alabama, Tennessee, and Georgia back in the 70s. As a student in the commercial music program at the University of North Alabama, he was able to hear many great songwriters in the famous Muscle Shoals Studios. He later toured with Norman and Nancy Blake and James Bryan as a member of the Rising Fawn String Ensemble, playing mandolin, guitar,banjo, and fiddle. He often plays as a duo with James Bryan, when possible with his partner (fiddler) Erynn Marshall, or as part of a trio with Bruce Green and Don Pedi.

James Bryan and Carl Jones

$8

Carl Jones has been involved in the old-time music community ever since he first attended fiddlers’ conventions in Alabama, Tennessee, and Georgia back in the 70s. As a student in the commercial music program at the University of North Alabama, he was able to hear many great songwriters in the famous Muscle Shoals Studios. He later toured with Norman and Nancy Blake and James Bryan as a member of the Rising Fawn String Ensemble, playing mandolin, guitar,banjo, and fiddle. He often plays as a duo with James Bryan, when possible with his partner (fiddler) Erynn Marshall, or as part of a trio with Bruce Green and Don Pedi.

James Bryan is considered by many to be the best traditional Southern fiddler playing today. Born in 1953 and raised in Boaz, Alabama, James began playing fiddle at the age of eleven. He was encouraged by his father Joe Bryan who played guitar, taught James his first tunes, and introduced him to area fiddlers such as Monk Daniels and members of the Johnson family. He learned tunes from local repertoires as well as bluegrass tunes from master fiddler Kenny Baker; who accepted Bryan as an apprentice. He won his first fiddlers' convention at the age of twelve. James and his father played at local radio stations, dances, and fiddle conventions. In 1970, at the age of sixteen, James won the title of Fiddle King at the Tennessee Valley Old Time Fiddler's Convention in Athens Alabama.

Coffeetree Song

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The Ridgewood Boys

Free!

Building on riveting father-son harmonies and a sound way bigger than two instruments should be able to make, the Ridgewood Boys make music that conjures up an Appalachian Sunday afternoon spent sitting on the front porch with friends and family. Chris and Rick Saenz love the old gospel songs, the ones you've known forever and the ones you haven't heard yet. Listening to the Ridgewood Boys sing is sure to lift your spirit and put a song in your own heart.

Kentucky Wild Horse

$7 - Seating reservations are filled, but standing room will be available

Old-time, bluegrass, swing, original music by one of the best string bands in Kentucky. John Harrod, Paul David Smith, Don Rogers, Jesse Wells and Roddy Puckett. MP opens at 7 p.m. with Nathan Link and members of the Centre College Appalachian Ensemble.


Kentucky Wild Horse takes its name from an old eastern Kentucky fiddle tune played by Wolfe County fiddler Darley Fulks (1895-1990) who possessed a vast repertoire of pre-Civil War tunes. Kentucky music from the 19th century down to the present, especially its fiddle and banjo traditions, has been our love and our inspiration.

Kentucky Wild Horse takes its name from an old eastern Kentucky fiddle tune played by Wolfe County fiddler Darley Fulks (1895-1990) who possessed a vast repertoire of pre-Civil War tunes. Kentucky music from the 19th century down to the present, especially its fiddle and banjo traditions, has been our love and our inspiration.

The Ridgewood Boys

No Admission Fee

Building on riveting father-son harmonies and a sound way bigger than two instruments should be able to make, the Ridgewood Boys make music that conjures up an Appalachian Sunday afternoon spent sitting on the front porch with friends and family. Chris and Rick Saenz love the old gospel songs, the ones you've known forever and the ones you haven't heard yet. Listening to the Ridgewood Boys sing is sure to lift your spirit and put a song in your own heart.

The Ridgewood Boys

No Admission Fee

Building on riveting father-son harmonies and a sound way bigger than two instruments should be able to make, the Ridgewood Boys make music that conjures up an Appalachian Sunday afternoon spent sitting on the front porch with friends and family. Chris and Rick Saenz love the old gospel songs, the ones you've known forever and the ones you haven't heard yet. Listening to the Ridgewood Boys sing is sure to lift your spirit and put a song in your own heart.

The Ridgewood Boys: Old-Time Music

No admission fee

The fourth performance of a five-part series, The Ridgewood Boys will be performing 'honky tonk' old-time tunes.


Building on riveting father-son harmonies and a sound way bigger than two instruments should be able to make, the Ridgewood Boys make music that conjures up an Appalachian Sunday afternoon spent sitting on the front porch with friends and family. Chris and Rick Saenz love the old gospel songs, the ones you've known forever and the ones you haven't heard yet. Listening to the Ridgewood Boys sing is sure to lift your spirit and put a song in your own heart.

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